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Taboo: Ten Facts You Can’t Talk About

Appearance Date: 11/6/2021

It has become virtually impossible to honestly discuss race, gender, and class issues in mainstream American society because, if you do dare to repeat certain “tabooo truths,” you will be ostracized as a bigot. Professor Wilfred Reilly (author of Hate Crime Hoax) fearlessly presents 10 of these truths here and investigates why the mainstream is so afraid to acknowledge that they’re true. Among these taboo truths:

  • Men and women are different, although equal. 
  • There is no epidemic of police murdering Black people. The year Black Lives Matter began, cops shot under 1,200 people, and only 258 of them were Black.
  • Crime rates vary among ethnic groups. The Black violent crime rate is about 2.4 times the white rate. Whites dominate corporate crime. Things like this affect outcomes for groups. 
  • There are almost no “pay gaps” between big groups, when variables other than race and sex are adjusted for.
  • The hard right (alt-right, QAnonsense) has as little to offer as the “woke” left Reilly criticized with these first few points. 

An honest conversation, rather than fanaticism on either political “side,” is the way to move America forward. This book contains the data that can START that conversation.

Meet the Author

Wilfred Reilly
Wilfred Reilly

Wilfred Reilly is an Associate Professor of Political Science at Kentucky State University, and the author of the books Taboo: 10 Facts You Can’t Talk About, Hate Crime Hoax, and The $50,000,000 Question. He is currently working on the upcoming project Alt-Wrongs: An American Case against Racial Nationalism, as well as sketching out a book looking at the transgender, gender-fluid, and Otherkin communities and the idea of flexible identity. Reilly has published pieces in Academic Questions, Commentary, Quillette, and a number of other journals and magazines. His research interests include international relations and the prevention of war, contemporary American race relations, and the use of modern quantitative methods to test “sacred cow” theories such as the existence of widespread white privilege. Off work, he enjoys dogs, archery, basketball, Asian cooking, and beer. Reilly has been described, by himself, as “the greatest mind of a generation.”